Things We Love: Fantastic Fauna of French Polynesia

Things We Love: Fantastic Fauna of French Polynesia

French Polynesia holds special meaning to me – it’s where my husband and I spent our honeymoon in 2014. We spent two weeks island-hopping, and even though the name Bora Bora evokes an exotic glamour, the islands still juxtapose dramatic, lush landscapes with a relaxed, slow-motion vibe that is absolutely contagious.

Our latest collection is inspired by the hues and motifs of French Polynesia, a French territory made up of a whopping 118 dispersed islands, located in the South Pacific. I was entranced by the lushness of the islands and the abundance of life found there – there is always fruit for picking and fish in the sea. The locals even say you can never starve there!

These influences resulted in a collection filled with fresh florals and tropical colours. Our mix and match pieces feature a combination of midnight blue and sunset orange, and we have new island-inspired prints appropriately named Tropicana and Hibiscus.

The florals, with their whimsical pineapple accents, remind us of laid-back Tahitian days. The midnight blue one-piece is easy to slip on and pair with flowy beach pants for warm nights.

Not sure what colours work for you? We’ve got it taken care of.

 

Pineapples, coconut palm trees, tiares, and hibiscuses

Pay a visit to the rugged, rocky island of Mo’orea, and pineapples are inescapable. Situated in the path of one of the abundant pineapple plantations along the “Route d’Ananas”, it’s impossible to experience the island without tasting the fruit or drinking its juice.

I was surprised to learn how easy it is to grow a pineapple – you just cut off the top of a fresh pineapple and plant the top – or, as our guide put it, “just throw it back on the ground and it will grow”. The ease seemed befitting of a place where things seem to happen calmly and effortlessly.

Coconut palm trees are one of the most common trees on the islands – coconut products make up most of the territory’s exports, and coconut husks laid out to dry by the roadside are not a rare sight. Common uses include food, drink, scented oil, and building shelter; coconuts are truly life sustaining! Learn how to make coconut ice cream at home here!

The tiare is a type of gardenia which grows on Tahiti, the largest Island of French Polynesia. It is symbolic and representative of the island, and is worn by both sexes during special ceremonies and holidays. It is used with other flowers to make traditional floral necklaces that are given to guests as a welcome gift. Other uses for the Ttare include perfumes, soaps, and scented oils.

Before Facebook, the tiare was the original indicator of your relationship status: wear it tucked behind your left ear to signal that you’re happily taken, or on your right to signal that you’re single and available.

 

Can’t get enough of the tropical vibes? Read more about 5 things that might surprise you about French Polynesia.






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